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-   -   Yahtzee Croshaw Appreciation Thread (https://www.tombraiderforums.com/showthread.php?t=223186)

JCGaming 31-07-19 01:59

Yahtzee Croshaw Appreciation Thread
 
Welcome to the The Man, The Myth, the Legend Ben "Yahtzee" Croshaw

One of gaming's most famous faces who from 2008 gave us the iconic series Zero Punctuation for the Escapist he's originally from England but in 2003 moved to Australia preferring the more laid back atmosphere. In 2013 along with his Aussie friend Gabriel created the iconic YouTube series Let's Drown Out which ran for 3 years before Yahtzee moved from Australia to America bringing an end to the series. His channel yahtzee19 is still there however there haven't been any updates since the end of LDO that said it still has over 200,000 subscribers.

In 2015 he also did another YouTube series called the Ego Review in which he reviewed games he'd created himself many years before whilst Gabriel played them. Gabriel still does gaming videos in late 2016 he joined his friend Aaron at the YouTube channel KeepetClassy they post videos on a regular basis.

Yahtzee also co-owned a Bar in Australia called the Manor Bar which brought the gaming community of Brisbane together to play there favorite games drink and chat after 5 years the bar closed down in 2015 due to business difficulties.

He now resides in America and still does Zero Punctation on a weekly basis he also posts live gaming streams on twitch with various guests including his girlfriend.

Dennis's Mom 31-07-19 18:19

I love Yahtzee. His tastes often reflect my own, so he's a good metric for me. Even when I disagree, I still laugh. Sadly, he uses too much profanity for us to link to him here.

He also writes novels, and I've read (listened on audiobook actually) and they are quite funny. They also are a lot deeper plot wise than you might expect.

Cochrane 31-07-19 20:38

Thanks for the reminder with the novels, I've had "Differently Morpheous" on my desk for ages and never got around to reading it.

I love Zero Punctuation! Even got an Imp plushy. Right now I'm very interested in the Dev Diary series. It almost gets me motivated enough to do some game programming of my own (which I used to do, very badly, years ago). Almost…

JCGaming 31-07-19 21:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dennis's Mom (Post 8116116)
I love Yahtzee. His tastes often reflect my own, so he's a good metric for me. Even when I disagree, I still laugh. Sadly, he uses too much profanity for us to link to him here.

He also writes novels, and I've read (listened on audiobook actually) and they are quite funny. They also are a lot deeper plot wise than you might expect.

I love his personality his charm his wit his laid back style If I'd had any sense I could of done similar things but its too late now. I love how he loves Silent Hill but not resident Evil because for all I've tried I cant get into Resident Evil but Silent Hill love it, love it.:D

Ashnod 31-07-19 22:32

I'm indifferent.

Sometimes I'm entertained, sometimes I'm not.

I don't normally agree with him (outside of his review of Portal), so, *shrug* meh. He's got his schtick. Just not for me.

redfox45 31-07-19 22:47

Back when he really took off I enjoyed watching him and the opening of his Psychonauts video is absolutely LEGENDARY, something I will always be able to recite.

As time went on though the forced cynicism in absolutely everything he reviewed became a bit tiring and I lost interest.
Even being insufferably cynical about games myself it started to feel less like a personal opinion piece and more if a "this weeks roast"

biscuits 31-07-19 22:52

His negativity and cynicism is just draining. I don't know why modern society thrives off of being negative and just annoyed all the time.

Admles 31-07-19 22:56

I love Yahtzee, I've had the pleasure of meeting him a few times :admles:

JCGaming 31-07-19 22:57

Quote:

Originally Posted by biscuits (Post 8116308)
His negativity and cynicism is just draining. I don't know why modern society thrives off of being negative and just annoyed all the time.

I enjoy the fact that someone with so much success in life as Yahtzee can focus on the miserable aspects but hes not everyone's cup of tea I guess.

Cochrane 04-08-19 08:35

Just finished "Differently Morphous". As you know, it's a London-based sort-of urban fantasy book about a secret ancient government agency protecting the world from monsters, who suddenly become public and now have to deal with… political correctness!

If you're anything like me, then your first reaction to that description was probably something along the lines of, "Oh my!". Novelist Yahtzee is nowhere near as much of an asshole as Zero Punctuation Yahtzee. Still, when the box blurb ends with "having to face their greatest threat: Political Correctness", you get a certain feeling of dread, as that phrase has never once been used in any nuanced discussion of this, or indeed any, topic. Here, it's not as bad as I feared, but it doesn't win any points for being woke either. It does make for an interesting case study overall. This includes minor spoilers.

The general setting is that an ancient ministry of occultism is tasked with keeping the UK safe from extra dimensional monsters, magic and such, and as part of that they used to regularly kill slime monsters whenever they appeared. But at the start of the book, the creatures (known as fluidics) have managed to learn english and to find someone more sympathetic, and are revealed to actually be fugitives instead of monsters. Everybody loves them, and the resulting outcry leads to the ministry being shoehorned into a modern form and getting a cultural awareness advisor. The actual plot involves people from this ministry trying to catch someone who murders these fluidics.

Like any Yahtzee book, it's well written and engaging, and it has some interesting ideas for things to do with this (admittedly not that original) setting. But this being Tumblr and all, I want to talk about the "political correctness" angle here. This angle is ultimately not integral to the plot at all, and just here to provide jokes, as the advisor declares "demonic possession" to be a slur within five minutes of first hearing that it exists, or shouts "consider the socioeconomic context of your actions!" right before the final battle.

That said, it's actually way more sympathetic to equality causes than it seems at first glance. Our protagonist is a young woman who constantly has to deal with men underestimating her and condescending to her. The fluidic creatures actually are nice, and not killing them is very explicitly not political correctness gone mad. There are a number of other times where the "politically correct" attitude, despite being constantly mocked, is eventually proven correct, including some that appear very late in the book so I won't spoil them.

Where the book ultimately fails, though, is that it is all about fundamentally reasonable people from the majority side discussing how to best treat the minority. Throughout it all, we get a lot of people talking about the politically correct way to address fluidics, but we never really get their perspective on anything. They are rather cartoonishly portrayed: They speak with funny accents, are incredibly polite, and their primary objective is to not cause a fuss. Oh, and they're super-useful, in that they happily eat nothing but garbage.

What's more, the book doesn't really have any racists in it. There's the murderer, obviously, but what with this being a crime mystery, their motivations remain entirely obscure until the end and they don't really interact with people. Discussing political correctness without mentioning racists is, of course, a lot like a book about parachutes that ignores the existence of airplanes: Yeah, it is easy to make fun of them that way, but you're entirely missing the point.

The lack of racism goes to absurd extremes at times, for example when the book includes supposed Youtube comments that are full of support for the weird-looking immigrants. It feels like the entire book was published about five years too late, really: At the tail end of the Obama years, when we got the social justice movement on the internet, but the idea that the racists would win the next US election seemed silly, this might have been more appropriate. Hell, this book starts with a bunch of refugees appearing in the middle of Europe, and literally everybody is happy about that.

Overall, this isn't bad, but its portrayal of political correctness feels a bit weird, and either way, Mogworld is still better.


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