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Old 16-05-19, 05:55   #1
HD Simplicityy
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Default Creating tombs/plot in prose versus game design

If you were reading a Tomb Raider story, would you want the tombs to be as complex as what you find in the games? More focused on character and pacing than mechanic and number of tombs? I've resumed working on my Lara Croft fanfiction, which is, as of tonight, (5/15/19) over 25,850 words in length in Google Docs. Been chalking away at it for over three years - since February 2016 - and just want to finish it now. Meandering too much with story ideas lets this go on and on and I want to move on. Giving myself around thirty more pages from page 52 (as of tonight on pg. 55). If needed I'll go farther.
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Old 16-05-19, 09:17   #2
Linoshi Croft
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I think the answer to this question is dependent on a lot of different things. For example;
  • Is Lara being handled as a pre-established character or is this an alternative version of the character?
  • Is this a solo adventure or do you have a cast of side characters?
  • Does the current content of the plot support a character driven experience?

Without context it's rather hard to give an opinion. Plus, it may be beneficial to simply take a step back and ask yourself what your intentions were when you initially started writing the fan-fiction? You are the writer at the end of the day and this is your creative vision.

If I had to give an opinion on the limited information I have I would say that focusing on developing the characters and pacing is more important than the number of tombs for the reason you have to give the audience a reason to care and be interested in what's happening. Plus, I think fewer but more fleshed out tombs with more detailed cultural information is more important than having numerous tomb locations where Lara simply dashes in and out of them without further explanation of the site she's exploring.
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Old 16-05-19, 15:22   #3
tomblover
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I think, from having read all of the official TR novels (well, except the Blade of Gwynnever) and a fair amount of fanfics - I can at least say for myself, that focusing too much on the moment-to-moment, especially in puzzle-solving, tends to lose me as a reader.

It's all well and good to feature the puzzles in the text, but having Lara solve them should never read like a set of IKEA assembly instructions.

It's kind of hard to explain, but consider maybe not giving the reader the full picture of what any given scenario looks like, so that it all reads more like an ongoing riddle, than simply a series of actions.

I'm personally a fan of letting a lot of things remain kind of "abstract", if that makes sense. Describing the setting only broadly, so that the reader has an image in their head, but not too detailed - just enough to evoke whatever you want the reader to feel.

That way, too, everything doesn't have to make realistic sense, unless you want it to. You can put a pitfall or a spike trap, or whatever, anywhere you'd like, if you need it. Does that make sense?

To me, the characters are the most interesting aspect of any written work, anyway - but depending on who Lara is for your story, it may not be so necessary to focus on her, so much as her way of handling the situations that she finds herself in.

Still, you want to delve into her thought process, more than what she may or may not be specifically doing - but leaving enough room for interpretation that it's not like going down a list.

With a character like Lara, I think you want to feel like she's the genius. It's not good if the reader has already figured something out - unless it's an obvious trap, and you want to illustrate classic Lara's tendency to not think before she acts, for example.
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Old 17-05-19, 04:35   #4
HD Simplicityy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linoshi Croft View Post
I think the answer to this question is dependent on a lot of different things. For example;
  • Is Lara being handled as a pre-established character or is this an alternative version of the character?
  • Is this a solo adventure or do you have a cast of side characters?
  • Does the current content of the plot support a character driven experience?

Without context it's rather hard to give an opinion. Plus, it may be beneficial to simply take a step back and ask yourself what your intentions were when you initially started writing the fan-fiction? You are the writer at the end of the day and this is your creative vision.

If I had to give an opinion on the limited information I have I would say that focusing on developing the characters and pacing is more important than the number of tombs for the reason you have to give the audience a reason to care and be interested in what's happening. Plus, I think fewer but more fleshed out tombs with more detailed cultural information is more important than having numerous tomb locations where Lara simply dashes in and out of them without further explanation of the site she's exploring.
Forgot to mention that stuff lol. Wow.
Alright, so Lara is with Jonah and Sam. Rather they're with her. Im using her character from RotTR in a post-RotTR story, with a mix of casual conversation and comedy. Definitely a cast of characters, including a new villain. Going with more character- driven plot than too action-y. Which is fine and all, having action, just wanted to explore Lara from more of a character centered approach than the games cover.
So what Ill do is make the tombs cater to her character's problem solving and her friends helping or observing. And not spending too much time building the obstacles/puzzles. Unless I write them detailed and flowable, it gets too step-by-step and stage-directioney when I stick to just that. Better to insert internal thinking and external dialogue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tomblover View Post
I think, from having read all of the official TR novels (well, except the Blade of Gwynnever) and a fair amount of fanfics - I can at least say for myself, that focusing too much on the moment-to-moment, especially in puzzle-solving, tends to lose me as a reader.

It's all well and good to feature the puzzles in the text, but having Lara solve them should never read like a set of IKEA assembly instructions.

It's kind of hard to explain, but consider maybe not giving the reader the full picture of what any given scenario looks like, so that it all reads more like an ongoing riddle, than simply a series of actions.

I'm personally a fan of letting a lot of things remain kind of "abstract", if that makes sense. Describing the setting only broadly, so that the reader has an image in their head, but not too detailed - just enough to evoke whatever you want the reader to feel.

That way, too, everything doesn't have to make realistic sense, unless you want it to. You can put a pitfall or a spike trap, or whatever, anywhere you'd like, if you need it. Does that make sense?

To me, the characters are the most interesting aspect of any written work, anyway - but depending on who Lara is for your story, it may not be so necessary to focus on her, so much as her way of handling the situations that she finds herself in.

Still, you want to delve into her thought process, more than what she may or may not be specifically doing - but leaving enough room for interpretation that it's not like going down a list.

With a character like Lara, I think you want to feel like she's the genius. It's not good if the reader has already figured something out - unless it's an obvious trap, and you want to illustrate classic Lara's tendency to not think before she acts, for example.
What I told Linoshi Croft, then. Thanks both of you!
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