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Old 03-02-09, 19:23   #1
suli
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Default Is St.Francis Folly a real place?

hey Guys I've always been a fan of that area , and I always wanted to know more about it , from where they inspired it , and is it inspired from a real place? and what have the desginers said about it?
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Old 04-02-09, 01:20   #2
gidierre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suli View Post
hey Guys I've always been a fan of that area
me too
I'm afraid I don't have may answers to give though

from
http://www.tombraiders.net/stella/wa...stfrancis.html
Quote:
First, a movie: Lara breaks into the Natla Technologies building in the middle of the night. Rifling through a filing cabinet, she locates a leather-bound book. In it, Lara reads of the tomb of Tihocan, one of the three legendary rulers of the lost continent Atlantis. According to the book, the tomb lies beneath the ruins of a monastery that the writer—presumably a monk—refers to as "St. Francis' Folly." The book also reveals that with Tihocan lies his piece of the Scion, a powerful object divided among the three rulers.
Next, Lara travels to St. Francis' Folly, apparently somewhere in Mediterranean Europe. She scales a mountain to reach the building. Outside she finds a campsite. Picking up an empty can, she remarks, "Pierre, you litterbug."
other than that,
the spot remains mysterious
but maybe someone else has some more insights to share
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Old 04-02-09, 01:26   #3
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It's probably inspired by various ruins and ancient myths, but it's unlikely that there is any location that collects even Anniversary's Hephaestus, Poseidon, Atlas and Damocles together. There are ruins all over the Mediterranean so there are ample locations that could have inspired the Folly.
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Old 04-02-09, 01:28   #4
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A while back someone posted in the TRA section a picture of a place that looks so much like the Anniversary-St. Francis' Folly that they must have based it off of that place. I can't find it, but you might want to do some searching.
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Old 04-02-09, 01:51   #5
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What's with the Folly part anyway ?

I could never get it.
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Old 04-02-09, 01:58   #6
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Originally Posted by gidierre View Post
What's with the Folly part anyway ?

I could never get it.
Applied to a building it usually means something that is built to be looked at. As far as I know in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries aristocrats became nostalgic for the Classical and Medieval periods - this coincides with the growth of Romanticism as an artistic movement and the resurgence of Neo-Classical and Neo-Gothic architecture.

As such, wealthy people would build 'ancient' monuments on their lands - fake castles and Greek temples on hills and in parkland - have you ever seen pictures of lakes with little round temples on islands in the middle? It was a fairly common style of folly back then.

It can also be a structure, ancient or modern, that was constructed at great cost with very little lasting value, use or appreciation by local people. Examples could include the great capital city that the Pharoah Akhenaton built when he changed the religion of Egypt completely; but which was a ruin less than fifty years after his death, and possibly the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh.

I know I hate that goddamn building!

Anyway, that's a folly as I understand it.
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Old 04-02-09, 02:13   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemmie View Post

Anyway, that's a folly as I understand it.
thx for the explanation

hard to believe, maybe, but
previously, the only relationship that came to my mind, as quizzical as inescapable, I'm afraid, was the Italian expression: il cavallo di San Francesco or, St. Francis' horse
that would amount to: on foot
because he was so poor
although we don't generally use it with a demeaning nuance.
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Old 04-02-09, 02:15   #8
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After seeing pics of it I realised that St Francis' Folly is very obviously inspired by Meteora:

http://www.meteora-greece.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteora
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Old 04-02-09, 02:18   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gidierre View Post
thx for the explanation

hard to believe, maybe, but
previously, the only relationship that came to my mind, as quizzical as inescapable, I'm afraid, was the Italian expression: il cavallo di San Francesco or, St. Francis' horse
that would amount to: on foot
because he was so poor
although we don't generally use it with a demeaning nuance.
Hey, these are the people who mixed up Thor with Roman and Greek gods! But (considering the historical foundations of fiction ) I don't think the building would have been originally named for St Francis, and may have been so because of the numbers of different animals in the building. My theory is on the Tomb Raider Wiki page - http://www.tombraiderwiki.com/index....ancis%27_Folly
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Last edited by Lemmie; 04-02-09 at 02:19.
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Old 04-02-09, 02:23   #10
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St. Francis' Folly monastery might have been inspired by the Sanctuary of La Verna.


http://translate.google.com.au/trans...26as_qdr%3Dall
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Verna
http://tuscany.travel/sacred-tuscany...ssed-mountain/

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